Cardigami

Competitive Card Building Game
⭠ Go Back
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Cardigami prototype in motion

Cardigami is a unique card deck where the cards can slot into one another. Each card has colors that indicate other cards it can slot into (red to red, etc.). Shapes are used along with colors to help color blind players distinguish the cards. The game functions like a traditional card deck, in which the cards can be used in a multitude of game rule sets, although a set of instructions was created to provide one way to play with the cards. The final game is production-ready and is publicly distributable through The Game Crafter company. The game costs $14 to make and includes 60 cards, a rule book, and the box.

Design

Constructing a game that encourages building

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Concept

I was inspired Constructive Complimenting to create another game building game but was competitive. I pitched an idea for Tower of Rubble—a game involving stacking various game pieces to achieve the highest tower—to a group of students and I was selected to have the game developed. I selected a team of students to help create the project with me as the project manager. The game would change significantly through development but still keep its building concept.

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Game Design

The cards are designed for building. Each card has eight cut slits with a variety of colors on it (red, blue, green, and/or yellow). Each color corresponds to a slit. Two cards can join together by slits that possess the same color (red to red, etc.). With this basic design, multiple games could be played with the card deck. We did ship a rule set with the game. The goal is to attach as many cards to your "structure" while having as few touching the ground. Players constantly grab from the draw pile, but only once they've attached their current card. Players get a point for every card not touching the ground, and whoever has the most points wins.

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Prototype Testing

The game rapidly developed due to constant prototyping. We gathered various game pieces from other existing games to test ideas for The Tower of Rubble. Since there were limited building pieces to use when ordering the production of the game, shipping this game wasn't possible at the time. We looked for cheaper alternatives and thought of cards. We cut slits into the cards and suddenly we were building again. We drafted card design ideas and created a deck prototype by cutting cards and coloring them with markers. We created multiple rule sets and gathered testers to play the game without our assistance to determine the game's clarity and enjoyment. These tests prompted us to add symbols to make the colors distinguishable (one prototype tester was colorblind) and adjust the rules to be more understandable.

Development Images and Prototype Testing